RCMP Veterans' Association (PEI)

For Members 

Survivors' and Executors' Guide

The Guide for Survivors' & Executors (2016) has recently been updated by Vic and Janet Gorman, NS Division.  They have generously shared their copyright edition to the Association for all to benefit.  The culmination of the many guides developed across the country, including the work done by members of the PEI Division, is greatly appreciated.  It is designed to assist members, their spouses, families, loved ones, executors and/or attorneys in planning their estates after their demise.

It is recommended that you take some time to read it, then adapt it to suit your specific needs.  Simply save the PDF file to your computer and it's now your document.  Take the time to fill it out as it will be of immeasurable assistance when the time comes.  Ensure your survivors and executors know where this document is, in hardcopy and electronic format.

Honour Guard

All retired and ex-members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are entitled to have a Veterans' Honour Guard at their Funeral or Memorial Service.  Unaffilliated veterans may serve on an Honour Guard.  The Secretary (Executive Director) coordinates the activities of the Honour / Ceremonial Guard.  No expense associated to a Honour Guard is transferred to the family of a deceased veteran.  The attached protocol explains responsibilities.

History 

"The RCMP's History" 

www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/hist/index-eng.htm

"Born out of a need for a national police force to implement the law in Canada's newly acquired western territories, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has evolved into a world-renowned organization of more than 28,000 people."


Virtual Museum of Canada

Special Thanks to the Virtual Museum of Canada for allowing us to share their exhibits with you:

Traditions

A Table Set for One

At a Regimental Dinner, fallen comrades are recognized by the setting of "A Table Set for One".  After calling the gathering to order, the Master of Ceremonies has the assembly rise, and the setting is explained.

The Piper's Toast

Before the Reformation, the "burgh piper", a man of peace was the town minstrel.  His counterpart, the "clan piper", led his chief's armies into war and would often entertain after dinner.  The Clan Piper would be invited into the dining hall for a dram of scotch with the Chief.

Passing the Port

Port wine is traditionally served at mess dinners.  It is attributed to the officers of the English Navy.  It was seen as a sign of peace and friendship.  Pouring the port with your right hand prevented you from drawing your sword or revolver.  You passed the port to the person on your left.  In navy traditions, the decanter is tipped and never loses touch with the table, while in the other forces, the decanter was never to touch the table until it needed replenishing.

Merchandise

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Protocol & Order of Dress 

The following guidelines are provided for the membership when determining the appropriate order of dress for various events.  Ref. Part VIII of the Association Manual.

Organizers of events, in consultation with the Division Secretary (and "L" Division S/S/M), will advise the membership on appropriate dress requirements.

In June 2014, the recommendations of the Committee on dress and protocol were approved at the Annual General Meeting.